The editors of Sky & Telescope make every effort to provide accurate information, but errors do sometimes slip through. We correct all mistakes online as well as printing corrections in the magazine. So if you see something questionable in the magazine, check below to see if it's a known problem.

This article lists all known errors in issues of Sky & Telescope for 2021. See also the errata listings for other years.

January 2021

Page 6: Joel Marks’s observation of a geostationary satellite was made with an unguided telescope, and his impression was that the geosat appeared to move through the background stars even though the satellite was itself motionless in the eyepiece field.

Page 64: Saint Raphael is from the Book of Tobit. Therefore, all of Julius Schiller’s constellations in the Southern Hemisphere are from the Old Testament.

February 2021

Page 18: The table in “Catching Celestial Butterflies” should have stated that M76 lies at +51° 34’.

Page 72: Discounting political alterations, time zones are centered on even 15° meridian lines. They don’t begin and end on those lines as stated in “Finding North by Day."

March 2021

Page 63: PuWe 1 is not the largest known planetary nebula, as stated in “Springtime Blossoms,” but it is one of the largest planetaries known.

April 2021

Page 17: An electron went missing from Branch 2 of the “Rare Reactions” diagram. The electron combines with a proton in Beryllium-7 to produce Lithium-7 and a neutrino.

May 2021

Page 38: The Rapid Approximate Spectral Calculations for All project is not an offshoot of the All Small Molecules project but rather an independent project created by Clara Sousa-Silva in 2016.

Page 50: The “Selected Jupiter Mutual Satellite Events” table had incorrect values in the “Mag. change” column. The correct ones are May 1: 0.0; 11: 0.7; 20: 0.5; 27: 0.4. Events with a change in magnitude of less than 0.3 are difficult to perceive, and those with a value of 0.0 are unobservable and shouldn’t have been included.

Page 58: The “Marly” telescope’s Campani lens referred to in “Giovanni Domenico Cassini and the Birth of Big Science” had a focal length of 136 feet (41 meters).

June 2021

Page 50: The “Selected Jupiter Mutual Satellite Events” table had incorrect values in the “Mag. change” column. The correct ones are June 1: 0.7; 10: 0.1; 18: 0.2; 21: 0.1; 28: 0.0. Events with a change in magnitude of less than 0.3 are difficult to perceive, and those with a value of 0.0 are unobservable and shouldn’t have been included.

Page 50: In “Mars Bumbles Through the Beehive,” the Beehive Cluster is almost 16 million times more remote than Mars.

Page 54: The image of Pine Mountain Observatory in “Working With What You Have” was a 30-minute exposure shot with a tripod-mounted Canon 80D DSLR set to ISO 200 and a Canon kit lens zoomed to 20 mm and f/6.3.

July 2021

Page 32: The open cluster in the image at the top left of the page is NGC 436.

Page 50: The “Selected Jupiter Mutual Satellite Events” table had an incorrect value in the “Mag. change” column. The correct one is July 5: 0.0. Events with a change in magnitude of less than 0.3 are difficult to perceive, and those with a value of 0.0 are unobservable and shouldn’t have been included.

Page 61: The second column of the table lists the distance between the comet and Earth in astronomical units.

August 2021

Page 18: Hubble's Variable Nebula is NGC 2261. 

Page 23: All instances of NGC 7133 should read IC 5132/33.

Page 36: Russell Hulse and Joseph Taylor discovered the first-ever binary pulsar.

September 2021

Page 77: Bray Falls’ image depicts the lunar eclipse on May 26, 2021.

October 2021

Page 18: In “The Case of the Dead Dinosaurs,” scientists found that releasing 100 gigatons of sulfur into the Cretaceous atmosphere would have caused the planet’s temperature to drop 25°C or 45°F.

Page 20: The Chicxulub impactor was 10 km wide, not 200 km as stated in the graphic.

Page 24: The Chicxulub impact released an estimated 400 billion tons of CO2.

Page 31: In the info box, SagDIG is a member of the Local Group but isn’t a satellite of the Milky Way.

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