All five naked-eye planets will line up in the dawn sky in June. Not only that, they’ll also be in their proper order from the Sun.

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Diana Hannikainen, Observing Editor, Sky & Telescope
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Gary Seronik, Consulting Editor, Sky & Telescope
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Susanna Kohler, Communications Manager and Press Officer, American Astronomical Society
+1 202-328-2010 x127, [email protected]


Note to Editors/Producers: This release is accompanied by high-quality graphics; see the end of this release for the images and links to download.


The delightful view of all five naked-eye planets will greet early risers throughout the month of June. While seeing two or three planets close together (in what’s known as a conjunction) is a rather common occurrence, seeing five is somewhat more rare. And what’s even more remarkable about this month’s lineup is that the planets are arranged in their natural order from the Sun.

Throughout the month of June, shortly before the Sun rises, viewers could see Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn — in that order — stretching across the sky from low in the east to higher in the south. Mercury will be tougher to spot: Early in the month, viewers will need an unobstructed eastern horizon as well as binoculars to potentially see the little world. As the month wears on, Mercury climbs higher and brightens significantly, making it easier to see, and thus completing the planetary lineup.

The last time the five naked-eye planets were strung across the horizon in sequence was in December 2004. But this year, the gap between Mercury and Saturn is much shorter.

There are several dates of note this month.

June 3–4: On these two mornings, the five planets span 91° when the separation between Mercury and Saturn will be at its smallest. Find a place with a clear view low toward the east to maximize your chances of catching Mercury. Bring binoculars. You’ll also need to make sure you’re in position well in time to enjoy the view of all five planets — you’ll have less than half an hour between when Mercury first appears above the horizon and when it essentially gets lost in the glare of the rising Sun.

June 24: According to Sky & Telescope magazine, the planetary lineup this morning is even more compelling. To begin with, Mercury will be much easier to snag, making the five-planet parade that much more accessible. And you’ll have about an hour to enjoy the sight, from when Mercury pops above the horizon to when the rising Sun washes it out of the sky. But the real bonus is the waning crescent Moon positioned between Venus and Mars, serving as a proxy Earth. By this time of month, the planets are spread farther across the sky — the distance between Mercury and Saturn will be 107°.

If it’s cloudy on the dates of note, you still have all the mornings in between to take in the view of the five naked-eye planets adorning the southeastern horizon. Just make sure you set your alarm and wake up on time.


Read more on this in the June 2022 issue of Sky & Telescope magazine.


Sky & Telescope is making the illustrations below available to editors and producers. Permission is granted for nonexclusive use in print and broadcast media, as long as appropriate credits (as noted) are included. Web publication must include a link to skyandtelescope.org.


Planet Parade 2022 June 3_900px
All five naked-eye planets line up in their proper order from the Sun during the month of June. On June 3–4, the separation between Mercury and Saturn will be at its smallest, at 91°. Mercury will be a challenge to spot earlier in the month. Click on the image for a higher-resolution version of the chart.
Sky & Telescope illustration
Planet Parade 2022 June 24_900px
At dawn on June 24th, the crescent Moon joins the planetary lineup. It's conveniently placed between Venus and Mars, serving as a proxy Earth. Click on the image for a higher-resolution version of the chart.
Sky & Telescope illustration

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