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SkyWeek TV April 28 - May 4, 2014

SkyWeek TV Archive

Last Month for SkyWeek TV

April 2014 will be the last month covered by Sky & Telescope's wildly popular SkyWeek TV show.

SkyWeek TV Archive

April 28 - May 4, 2014

The planet Mars is high in the evening sky. It’s two weeks past its closest approach to Earth, but it’s still shining as bright as it ever will this year.

SkyWeek TV Archive

April 21 - 27, 2014

Magnificent Leo the Lion, one of the few constellations that really resembles its name, is high in the south. Regulus, its brightest star, is important in history and science.

SkyWeek TV Archive

April 14 - 20, 2014

Late on Monday April 14th or very early on Tuesday morning, weather permitting, everyone in North America gets to witness a total eclipse of the Moon.

SkyWeek TV Archive

April 7 - 13, 2014

Get ready for next week’s total lunar eclipse, one of the most thrilling spectacles that nature has to offer. Find out why eclipses happen and how to view them.

SkyWeek TV Archive

March 31 - April 6, 2014

The waxing crescent Moon passes through the Hyades cluster on Thursday. If you watch long enough, you may see the Moon’s dark edge blot out one or more stars.

SkyWeek TV Archive

March 17 - 23, 2014

People living along a narrow path from New York City to Ontario can watch an asteroid blot out the bright star Regulus around 2 a.m. on Thursday, March 20th.

SkyWeek TV Archive

March 24 - 30, 2014

The waning crescent Moon pairs spectacularly Venus in the predawn sky. And many stargazers will try to view all 110 objects cataloged by the 18th-century astronomer Charles Messier.

SkyWeek TV Archive

March 10 - 16, 2014

Three planets are on display in the predawn sky: dazzling Venus low in the southeast, rapidly brightening Mars in Virgo, and Saturn, the ringed wonder, in Libra.

SkyWeek TV Archive

March 3 - 9, 2014

Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system, flies almost overhead on March evenings. It’s an amazingly dynamic world, and a treat to view through a telescope.

SkyWeek TV Archive

February 24 - March 2, 2014

The Great Orion Nebula is the most active star-forming region in our sector of the Milky Way Galaxy. It’s a breath-taking sight when viewed through a telescope.

SkyWeek TV Archive

February 17 - 23, 2014

Mighty Orion, the brightest constellation, flies high in the early evening sky. And late on Wednesday evening, the planet Mars and the bright star Spica float above the Moon.

SkyWeek TV Archive

February 10 - 16, 2014

The Moon is full on Friday, to the right of the bright star Regulus in Leo. The crater Tycho and its amazing ray system are especially bright at full Moon.

SkyWeek TV Archive

February 3 - 9, 2014

The magnificent constellation Canis Major, the Big Dog, is at its highest in the south on February evenings. It is host to Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky.

SkyWeek TV Archive

January 27 - February 2, 2014

Mercury and Venus, the innermost planets, are visible all week at dusk and dawn, respectively. The thin crescent Moon visits Venus early in the week and Mercury late in the week.

SkyWeek TV Archive

January 20 - 26, 2014

The Moon visits Mars and Saturn in the predawn sky this week. This is an exciting time to view both planets. Mars is brightening rapidly, and Saturn’s rings are on great display.

SkyWeek TV Archive

January 13 - 19, 2014

This is a great time to view Jupiter, the king of the planets. It’s well up in the east by the time the sky grows dark, and very high by late evening.

SkyWeek TV Archive

January 6 - 12, 2014

Orion floats high in the south on January evenings. Its seven main stars form a pattern that has been likened to a giant man or woman all around the world.

SkyWeek TV Archive

December 30, 2013 - January 5, 2014

At the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Eve, Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, is at its highest in the south. And even brighter Jupiter flies high above it.

SkyWeek TV Archive

December 23 - 29, 2013

More bright stars are visible now than at any other time of year. Seven of the sky’s 21 first-magnitude stars are concentrated in a single, amazing formation called the Winter Hexagon.

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