241–260 of 282 results

Stargazing with Tony Flanders

Dressing Up for an Evening Out

Proper clothing makes cold-weather observing a treat.

Stargazing with Tony Flanders

Equipment

Astronomical equipment: blessing or curse?

Stargazing with Tony Flanders

Waiting for Sagittarius

The glories of the summer Milky Way remain tantalizingly out of reach.

Stargazing with Tony Flanders

The Meaning of Stargazing

Does stargazing have a purpose or is it just plain fun?

Totally Eclipsed Moon

Observing

Gazing Upon Earth's Shadow

Skimming near the northernmost edge of Earth's shadow, the Moon experienced a relatively bright eclipse on March 3rd.

Stargazing with Tony Flanders

A Spontaneous Star Party

A lunar eclipse gathers a crowd of congenial strangers.

Stargazing with Tony Flanders

Celestial Time and Human Time

The orbits of the outer planets mark out a human life.

Stargazing with Tony Flanders

Instant Astronomy

Sometimes a stargazing session is short and sweet.

Stargazing with Tony Flanders

June in February

Time-travel to late spring by observing before dawn.

Stargazing with Tony Flanders

Stars and Snowflakes

What do they have in common besides the letter S?

Stargazing with Tony Flanders

Mercury Retrospective

Following a planet day by day can be surprisingly rewarding.

Stargazing with Tony Flanders

Keeping Myself Honest

On-the-job observing is a blast!

Stargazing Basics

Constellation Names and Abbreviations

Here's all the essential information about the 88 constellations.

Observing

Observe Mysterious Mercury

Mercury, probably the least observed of the eight major planets, is well placed in the evening sky during the first half of February 2007 for observers in the Northern Hemisphere.

Stargazing Basics

The Greek Alphabet

Here's a handy guide to the Greek letters that are used on star charts.

Stargazing with Tony Flanders

Hello World

How I started doing "serious" observing.

Observing

Comet Tail Still Visible Up North

It's been several days since anyone in the Northern Hemisphere saw the head of Comet McNaught. But the comet's tail is so bright and long that numerous northern observers have spotted it two or more hours after the head has set. All you need to try is a site with a good western horizon that's far from any artificial light pollution.

Observing

Comet McNaught, Spectacle of the Far-Southern Sky

As of January 18th, Comet McNaught is barely visible from the Northern Hemisphere, but the show is just beginning for observers at mid-southern latitudes.

Comet McNaught Jan 9-12, 40° north.

Observing

Comet McNaught Heading South

If you live in the Northern Hemisphere, Friday was your last good opportunity to catch Comet McNaught in the evening twilight — though January 13th isn't completely out of the question. On January 14th or 15th, the comet will become a showpiece for observers in the Southern Hemisphere.

Observing

Comet McNaught Brightening

Comet McNaught has brightened rapidly in the last few days. It's now bright, beautiful, and, if you're fairly far north, easy to see at dawn and dusk — if you know where to look and have an unobstructed horizon and perfect conditions. It's now a naked-eye spectacle from far northern latitudes, where the observing geometry is most favorable. The farther south you live, the lower the comet is in the twilight.

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