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Crescent Moon with Aldebaran and Pleiades, April 15-16, 2021

This Week's Sky At a Glance

This Week's Sky at a Glance, April 9 – 17

Arcturus ascends in the east as Sirius sinks in the southwest. Orion tilts further as the Dipper rides high. And this week Mars threads the horntips of Taurus, closely followed by the crescent Moon.

The waning Moon passes under Saturn and Jupiter at dawn, April 6-7, 2021

Celestial News & Events

This Week's Sky at a Glance, April 2 – 10

Winter stars in the west are giving way to spring stars in the east, while little Mars shines on. Meanwhile, the waning Moon passes under Jupiter and Saturn at dawn.

Saturn and Jupiter at dawn, early April 2021

This Week's Sky At a Glance

This Week's Sky at a Glance, March 26 – April 3

Fading Mars glows above orange Aldebaran high in the west after dark. Orion tilts into his spring posture, with his belt horizontal. Arcturus climbs up in the east.

Moon and Regulus, March 24-25, 2021

Celestial News & Events

This Week's Sky at a Glance, March 19 – 27

The waxing Moon shines with Mars and Aldebaran on Friday evening the 19th. From there the Moon marches east day by day – first between the horn stars of Taurus, then across Gemini to sidle up to Castor and Pollux on the 22nd.

Moon passing Mars and Aldebaran, March 18-19, 2021

Celestial News & Events

This Week's Sky at a Glance, March 12 – 20

The waxing Moon passes between Mars and Aldebaran in the evening sky. Arcturus, the "Spring Star," climbs up in the east, while wintry Orion tilts down in the southwest.

Jupiter, Saturn, Mercury, with Moon, March 9-10, 2021

This Week's Sky At a Glance

This Week's Sky At a Glance, March 5 – 13

Sirius shines high on the meridian right after dark, as Orion starts tilting westward. Mars keeps company with the Pleiades. And three planets help you greet the dawn.

Mars with Aldebaran and Pleiades, March 4, 2021

Celestial News & Events

This Week's Sky at a Glance, February 26 – March 6

Mars is passing the Pleiades. Sirius and Canis Major take over the early-evening meridian from Orion. And low in the dawn, Jupiter closes in on Mercury.

Celestial News & Events

This Week's Sky at a Glance, February 19 – 27

Sirius the Dog Star blazes high in the southeast after dinnertime, the brightest star of Canis Major. Spot it lower left of Orion. The stars of Canis Major can be connected to form a convincing dog profile.

Moon passing Mars and Aldebaran, Feb. 18-20, 2021

Celestial News & Events

This Week's Sky at a Glance, February 12 – 20

The Moon, waxing through first quarter, passes Mars and Aldebaran high in the evening sky.

Moon and Antares at dawn, Feb 5-7, 2021

Celestial News & Events

This Week's Sky at a Glance, February 5 – 13

The sky's biggest asterism — at least the biggest one widely recognized — is the Winter Hexagon. It fills the sky toward the east and south these evenings. Start with brilliant Sirius at its bottom. . .

Moon and Antares at dawn, Feb 5-7, 2021

This Week's Sky At a Glance

This Week's Sky at a Glance, January 29 – February 6

Once the night is fully dark, spot the equilateral Winter Triangle in the southeast. Sirius is its brightest and lowest star. Betelgeuse stands above Sirius by about two fists at arm's length. To the left of their midpoint is Procyon. Compare their colors!

Moon, Aldebaran, Pleiades Jan 22-24, 2021,

This Week's Sky At a Glance

This Week's Sky at a Glance, January 22 – 30

Right after dark, face east and look very high. The bright star there is Capella, the Goat Star. To the right of it, by a couple of finger-widths at arm's length, is a small, narrow triangle of 3rd- and 4th-magnitude stars known as "the Kids." Though they're not exactly eye-grabbing, they form a never-forgotten asterism with Capella.

Moon passing Mars, Jan 20-21, 2021

Celestial News & Events

This Week's Sky at a Glance, January 15 – 23

Bright Capella high overhead, and equally bright Rigel in Orion's foot, have almost the same right ascension. This means they cross your sky’s meridian at almost exactly the same time. So whenever Capella passes the zenith, Rigel marks true south, and vice versa. That happens around 9 or 10 p.m. now.

This Week's Sky At a Glance

This Week's Sky at a Glance, January 8 – 16

Twilight challenge: the planet-conjunction finale! Jupiter and Saturn are becoming ever harder to pick up low in bright twilight, but bring those binoculars on Saturday Jan. 9th. Because then they'll be three! Mercury is emerging to join them. It will pass by them for a couple more days.

This Week's Sky At a Glance

This Week's Sky at a Glance, January 1 – 9

As Jupiter and Saturn continue to draw apart, they're sinking ever lower in the southwest in twilight. How much longer can you keep them in view?

This Week's Sky At a Glance

This Week's Sky at a Glance, December 25 – January 1

Jupiter and Saturn remain close together low in the southwest in twilight, though they're widening every day. They'll sink away into the sunset after New Year's.

Jupiter and Saturn in conjunction at dusk, Dec 21, 2020

This Week's Sky At a Glance

This Week's Sky at a Glance, December 18 – 26

This is the week of Jupiter and Saturn's super-close conjunction, and the whole world will be watching. Their separation narrows each evening until December 21st, then re-widens.

Saturn-Jupiter near Capricorn

This Week's Sky At a Glance

This Week's Sky at a Glance, December 11 – 19

Jupiter and Saturn are getting strikingly close together! Look southwest in early evening. And on the other side of the sky, Orion comes into view low in the east after dinnertime, below the Pleiades and Aldebaran.

Jupiter and Saturn at dusk, early Dec 2020

This Week's Sky At a Glance

This Week's Sky at a Glance, December 4 – 12

Jupiter and Saturn continue closing toward their record-breaking conjunction 0.1° apart on December 21st. Mars stands high, and Orion is on the rise.

This Week's Sky At a Glance

This Week's Sky at a Glance, November 27 – December 5

Bright Jupiter and Saturn are almost as close together now as modest, 3rd-magnitude Alpha and Beta Capricorni above them. Wait for full dark to catch the faint stars.

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