1101–1120 of 1,183 results

Celestial News & Events

The April 8th Eclipse of the Sun

In early April, observers in many parts of the Americas will see the Moon make a dent in the edge of the Sun.

Celestial News & Events

The April 24th Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

Observing an eclipse isn't usually challenging, but detecting the pale outer fringe of Earth's shadow on the full lunar face can be tricky.

Astronomy & Observing News

NGC 1316: Dust in the Wind

Dust clouds silhouetted against the giant galaxy NGC 1316 are all that remain of a swallowed spiral.

Astronomy & Observing News

Astro Image in the News:
Rosetta Buzzes Earth

Many sky photographers caught the little Rosetta probe as it whizzed by Earth on its way to landing on a comet in 2014.

Celestial News & Events

Watch a Spacecraft Buzzing Earth

European observers can catch the interplanetary Rosetta craft zipping by at 8th or 9th magnitude on March 4th.

Astronomy & Observing News

Asteroid 2004 MN4: A Really Near Miss!

Radar results are in: this once-scary asteroid will become a naked-eye object when it skims by Earth in 2029.

Variable Stars

Delta Scorpii Still Showing Off

For the fourth summer in a row, the head of the bright constellation Scorpius looks a little unusual.

Celestial News & Events

A Late-Night Jupiter Occultation

The waning Moon covers bright Jupiter before dawn on December 7th for observers in the eastern two-thirds of the US and Canada.

Celestial Objects to Observe

A Daytime Occultation of Jupiter

Here's a blue-sky project if ever there was one. The thin waning crescent Moon will occult the second-brightest planet as seen from much of North America on Tuesday, November 9th.

Celestial Objects to Observe

The Closest Whiz-by of Toutatis

An asteroid several kilometers wide will brighten to 9th magnitude and be visible in small telescopes when it passes Earth in late September.

Astronomy & Observing News

Wild, Weird Titan Reveals More Secrets

The most Earthlike world in the solar system is also the strangest ever encountered.

Paths of Vesta and Uranus in late 2004

Celestial Objects to Observe

Spot Vesta (and Uranus)

Two solar-system bodies just below naked-eye brightness can be found with binoculars in eastern Aquarius on October and November evenings: the minor planet 4 Vesta and Uranus.

Astronomy & Observing News

Astro Image in the News:
Something Warm in a Very Dark Place

The Spitzer Space Telescope finds an infrared glow hidden in a dark cloud where nothing ought to be.

Astronomy & Observing News

Astro Image in the News:
Hubble Snaps a Shadow-Spotted Jupiter

Hubble made an infrared movie of Jupiter last March while three of the planet's moons were casting their shadows on its face.

Celestial News & Events

October's Ideal Lunar Eclipse

The total lunar eclipse on October 27th is beautifully timed and placed for skywatchers in the Americas. Don't miss it: it's the last one until 2007.

Astronomy & Observing News

Earth's Twisty Spacewarp

Einstein wins again. Evidence from superstable satellites indicates that Earth's rotation twists the space around us — ever so slightly.

Astronomy & Observing News

The Dim Core of a Stripped Star

A dim, Jupiter-size object orbiting a white dwarf seems to be the last remaining bit of an eroded star's core.Art by Jon Lomberg / Gemini Observatory. Deep in Eridanus is a 17th-magnitude white dwarf that occasionally brightens to magnitude 14.5, as tracked by amateurs in the American Association of Variable…

Observing

Catch the End of the Perseids

It's not too late to catch the tapering-down of the Perseid meteor shower during the nights after its peak.

Astronomy & Observing News

Sedna's Origin Solved?

An artist's conception of the large object, informally named Sedna, discovered last year at more than twice Pluto's distance from the Sun.Courtesy NASA / JPL / Caltech / R. Hurt. Last year astronomers discovered what’s probably the biggest body found in the solar system since Pluto in 1930, and they…

Astronomy & Observing News

Delta Scorpii Brighter Than Ever

A naked-eye star in the dawn continues its unexpected — and very obvious — flareup.

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