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Why is Jupiter's Great Red Spot shrinking?

Celestial News & Events

Jupiter's Not-So-Great Red Spot

Astronomers don't know why Jupiter's iconic Great Red Spot has been gradually shrinking since the 1800s — or why the downsizing has accelerated during the past two years. Update: On May 15th, NASA released newly taken images of the Great Red Spot (at bottom below) to show its declining size…

Planets

Uranus and Neptune in 2014

Uranus and Neptune are easy to find with the aid of the charts in this article.

Celestial Objects to Observe

Jupiter Facts: Big, Bright, and Beautiful

The King of Planets reached opposition in the first half of January but it's still big and bright, a captivating sight no matter how you look at it.

Saturn and its rings

Planets

Viewing Saturn: The Planet, Rings and Moons

Viewing Saturn is an old favorite for every telescope user. Here's a guide to seeing all that you can see on the ringed planet.

Planets

A Saturn Almanac

Spectacular Saturn is a perennial favorite of telescope users everywhere. Click here to find printable data on the positions of Saturn's rings and planets.

Planets

A Big, Bright, and Beautiful Jupiter

The "King of Planets," which will dominate the evening sky from late 2011 through early 2012, is a captivating sight no matter how you look at it.

Celestial Objects to Observe

Erratum: Jupiter's Moons for May 2008

The Galilean-satellite events published in Sky & Telescope's May 2008 issue are incorrect. Here's the correct listing.

Pro-Am Collaboration

Mercury, Messenger, and Observers

As the first images are released from Messenger's flyby of the innermost planet, previous ground-based observations are proving to be surprisingly accurate.

Planets

Catching the Messenger of the Gods

Mercury is a rewarding challenge for planetary astrophotographers, as this amazing image by Massachusetts amateur John Boudreau demonstrates.

Planets

Finding Uranus and Neptune in 2006

Binoculars and our charts are all you need to spot these twin outer planets.

Celestial Objects to Observe

Phenomena of Jupiter's Moons

Virtually any telescope will show Jupiter's four Galilean satellites and their interesting interactions with the planet or its shadow.

Pandora

Planets

A Guide to the Moons of the Solar System

Not so long ago, astronomers thought only a few dozen moons orbited the planets of our solar system. Today, the total count tops 170!

Sketch of Jupiter

Planets

Jupiter: The Ultimate Observing Guide

Viewing the solar system¹s largest planet can be more than fun — even with a modest telescope, you can make observations of lasting scientific value.

Planets

Mercury in the Morning

Amateurs are observing this elusive planet more successfully than ever before; try spotting it yourself.

Celestial Objects to Observe

A Mars Record for the Ages

On August 27, 2003, at 9:51 Universal Time, the centers of Earth and Mars will be only 34,646,418 miles apart. Has Mars ever been this close before?

Planets

Mars at Its All-Time Finest

Never before in human history has such a golden opportunity to observe the red planet presented itself, so make the most of it with our Mars observing guide for 2003.

Planets

The Martian Moons in 2007–08

If you've never spied Mars's two satellites, Phobos and Deimos, the end of 2007 is your best chance for a long time. You'll need a big telescope — and you'll need to know exactly where to look.

Planets

Uranus and Neptune in 2005

From now to year's end, our finder charts will help you locate Uranus (in Aquarius), Neptune (in Capricornus), and Pluto (in Ophiuchus).

Planets

The Moon Meets Jupiter and Venus

The crescent Moon joins Jupiter and Venus in the east at dawn to create a beautiful scene on November 9th and 10th.

Planets

Five Planets In a Twilight Sky

Until early April, all five planets that are ever visible to the unaided eye shine at once during dusk.

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