21–40 of 98 results

Comets

Rosetta's Comet Campaign Wants YOU!

Participate in a world-wide campaign to observe and photograph Comet 67P/C-G as it approaches and recedes from the Sun with Rosetta in tow. Your observations matter.

Pro-Am Collaboration

Pro-Am Collaboration Yields Stunning Images

Amateur astronomers have teamed up with the pros to produce four stunning multiwavelength images of galaxies M101, M81, M51, and Centaurus A.

Celestial News & Events

Take a Stand Against Light Pollution!

"Globe at Night" is a fun, easy, and worthwhile activity for you and your family. Please join this worldwide campaign to measure the darkness of night skies everywhere from April 29th to May 8th.

Exoplanets

Amateurs Help Find Multi-Planet System

Amateur astronomers perform a crucial role in detecting exoplanets by a technique called microlensing, including the most recent discovery of a multiple-planet system.

Astronomy and Stargazing Projects

A Star Count for Everyone

Take part in this year's Great World Wide Star Count, and you'll be joining thousands of other "citizen scientists" in raising dark-sky awareness around the globe.

Pro-Am Collaboration

List of Amateur Research Organizations

Modern technology allows amateurs around the globe to collaborate in ways never before possible. The following is a collection of some of the research projects we find most interesting, many of which involve collaboration with professional astronomers at universities and other research organizations. These projects generally require more sophisticated equipment…

Dome at Lowell Observatory

Pro-Am Collaboration

Lowell Observatory's Pro-Am Initiative

If you're a serious stargazer with good gear, a passion for observing, and some free time, a team of astronomers at Lowell Observatory hope to hear from you.

New nova in Sagittarius

Pro-Am Collaboration

Nova in Sagittarius: Nova Sagittarii 2012 No. 4

A nova visible in good binoculars was spotted July 7, 2012, by observers in Japan.

Pro-Am Collaboration

Possible Occultation by Pluto Tonight (June 13-14)

Both Pluto and the star are 14th magnitude, but observers with big telescopes and sufficient video capability should try to record this important event.

Celestial News & Events

Join the "Target Asteroids!" Project

If you're an amateur observer with decent equipment and an itch to do some serious observing, a team from the OSIRIS-REx mission wants to hear from you!

Great World Wide Star Count

Celestial News & Events

The Great World Wide Star Count

Join thousands of other "citizen scientists" in raising dark-sky awareness around the globe.

Pro-Am Collaboration

Antiope Occultation Yields Double Bonanza

When observers fanned out last July 19th to record a binary asteroid's passage across a distant star, they hoped to gain scientifically important new findings. The results are in, and they've scored big-time!

Pro-Am Collaboration

Amateur Search for White-Dwarf Planets

Arizona amateur Bruce Gary is assembling a pro-am team to look for planets orbiting dead stars.

Comet Ikeya-Murakami

Pro-Am Collaboration

New Binocular Comet in the Morning Sky

On November 3, 2010, two amateurs in Japan discovered an 8th-magnitude comet visually. It's visible in binoculars.

Pro-Am Collaboration

How Dark Are Your Skies?

Take part in this year's Great World Wide Star Count, and you'll be joining thousands of other "citizen scientists" in raising dark-sky awareness around the globe.

Stellar Science

One Supernova, Many Camera Angles

"Light echoes" off dust clouds far from an old supernova are still providing replays of the explosion — as seen from different directions. They show that the explosion was asymmetric.

Pro-Am Collaboration

Asteroid To Hide Naked-Eye Star

For anyone in a 25-mile-wide path right across Los Angeles, a bright star in Ophiuchus will wink off for several seconds in the predawn hours of April 6, 2010.

Pro-Am Collaboration

New Comet Machholz

California's comet-hunting veteran Don Machholz bagged his 11th discovery on March 23 and 26, 2010. It's a faint diffuse comet, low in the morning sky.

Pro-Am Collaboration

Nova in Eridanus

Japanese amateur Koichi Itagaki, of recent comet fame, has just discovered a nova near Rigel on November 25, 2009.

Pro-Am Collaboration

New York Teen Finds Wimpiest Supernova

On November 7, 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore of Warwick, New York, discovered a supernova in the galaxy UGC 12682, making her the youngest person ever to find an exploding star.

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