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Celestial News & Events

Planet Trio Dances at Dawn

Jupiter, the King of Planets, has the evening sky pretty much all to itself. But three other planets — Venus, Mercury, and Saturn — are putting on quite a show in the east before dawn.

Celestial News & Events

Juno in the Spotlight

For the next few weeks, you have the opportunity to spot one of the first asteroids ever discovered.

Celestial News & Events

Jupiter's Moons Dance for You!

Right now you can watch one of Jupiter's satellites hide another with its own disk or shadow. These pairings only happen every six years!

Celestial News & Events

Jupiter Blots Out a Star

From August 2nd to 5th, the 6th-magnitude star 45 Capricorni masquerades as a fifth moon of Jupiter, forming striking patterns with the Galilean moons. And at the peak of the action, the star passes behind Jupiter's disk.

Celestial News & Events

A Daring Pairing of Moon and Venus

Early risers today have a chance to see this beautiful crescent Moon slide past Venus in the dawn sky. This view by Johnny Horne was captured at 5:34 a.m. EDT at Wade, North Carolina

Celestial News & Events

Spot Titan's Shadow on Saturn!

Take advantage of Saturn's nearly edge-on orientation to see Titan and its shadow crossing Saturn's bright face during April, May, and June.

Celestial News & Events

Venus at its 8-Year Best

Venus spent the last nine months as the Evening Star, but it's now faintly visible to the unaided eye just before sunrise — and possibly also just before sunset on the same day. For telescopic observers, this is the most exciting possible time to view Venus during broad daylight. But when doing this, be super-careful not to look at the Sun and blind yourself!

Geminid meteor

On the Road with David Levy

An Alpha Leonid Meteor Watch?

Few meteor showers are a cascade of shooting stars. Sky & Telescope contributing editor David H. Levy explains that there's simple pleasure in paying attention to sparser showers.

On the Road with David Levy

A Night to Remember

Sky & Telescope contributing editor David H. Levy joins our cadre of bloggers. Check out what he's been up to "On the Road."

Celestial News & Events

Catch Ceres at Its Closest

Ceres, the biggest asteroid and the first to be discovered, has an extraordinary good apparition in February and March 2009.

Celestial News & Events

View Vesta at Its Brightest

Vesta, the brightest asteroid, is easy to observe during the last three months of 2008.

Celestial News & Events

Moon Crosses the Pleiades

On Friday night, September 19–20, observers in northeastern North America, eastern Canada, and western Europe have a fine chance to watch the Moon cover up stars in the Pleiades.

Observing

The Amazing August Planet Show

All five of the classical planets are visible shortly after sunset in mid-August. But observers at mid-northern latitudes will need very clear skies, an unobstructed western horizon, and binoculars to see some of them.

Celestial News & Events

Venus Returns

Earth's sister planet has emerged from behind the Sun for a low evening apparition. See how early you can spot it in the twilight.

Celestial News & Events

All Hail, King Jupiter!

The King of Planets has made a dramatic entrance into the early evening sky. Don't miss your chance to see it while it's big and bright!

Celestial News & Events

Jupiter's Third Red Spot May Have Survived

Jupiter's newest red spot was disrupted during its encounter with the Great Red Spot and Oval BA, but appears to be reforming.

Celestial News & Events

Have You Seen Comet Boattini?

Comet Boattini, now faintly visible to the unaided eye from sites without light pollution, is climbing rapidly higher in the Northern Hemisphere's dawn sky.

Celestial News & Events

The Four-Planet Dance of 2008

Every evening in August and September 2008, just after sunset, four planets and two first-magnitude stars combine to form fascinating and ever-changing patterns.

Celestial News & Events

Mars Meets the Beehive

The Red Planet travels through one of the biggest and brightest star clusters in the sky from May 21st to the 24th. As a warm-up, stargazers watched Mars pass a hair's-breadth north of 5th-magnitude Eta Cancri on the evening of May 19th in easternmost America and the morning of the 20th in western Europe.

Celestial News & Events

Comet Boattini: Barely Visible Now, Bright in July?

Comet C/2007 W1 (Boattini) has reached 5th magnitude as of early June. It's now visible only from the Southern Hemisphere. When it reappears for northerners in July, will it be naked-eye?

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